Wine vs Champagne: DIFFERENCES + How to Choose One

How many times have you heard these two terms thrown around?

Wine and champagne are quite different, though both are made from fermented grapes. Add sparkling wine to the mix and confusion abounds.

In this Wine vs Champagne comparison, we’ll tell you everything you need to know about wine, sparkling wine, and champagne so you’ll be able to choose which one you want!

Wine vs Champagne vs Sparkling Wine – The Differences

pouring sparkling wine
Wine is uncarbonated, sparkling wine is carbonated, and Champagne is a type of sparkling wine.

Wine vs champagne is easy to determine. Wine is an uncarbonated beverage made from wine grapes.

Most wines are red, white, or pink. Champagne is a sparkling wine made in the Champagne region of France.

Sparkling wine is any type of carbonated wine, regardless of the region where it originates.

It is typically made bubbly by allowing a small amount of fermentation to continue after bottling.

The fermentation builds carbon dioxide in the bottle which gets infused into the wine.

When uncorking, the carbon dioxide is released in tiny bubbles which create effervescence in the wine.

Read our related article, Is Champagne Carbonated? where we take a closer look at this beverage!

What is Champagne?

champagne service
Champagne is a sparkling wine made to exacting standards in the Champagne region of France.

Champagne is a sparkling wine produced in the Champagne region of France under strictest guidelines. It has a delicate, gentle bubbling texture that is never overpowering.

To be called a type of champagne, the wine must be produced in the “champagne method.”

Champagne production has undergone huge technological advances since the early days of exploding bottles.

The name “Champagne” comes from the town of the same name in the Île-de-France region of France.

When people say that they have champagne, they usually refer to sparkling wine.

Read our related article, Does Champagne Have Gluten? If you’re sensitive to gluten, this article is for you! We answer the most common questions.

What is Sparkling Wine?

sparkling wine in a flute
Sparkling wines come in many colors and flavors from fruity, deep reds to dry, citrusy whites.

Sparkling wine is similar to champagne, but it is made anywhere in the world and can be much more carbonated than champagne.

Vineyards have various wine blends and names they use for sparkling wines so there are many flavors to choose from.

While Champagne is a specific drink with a specific flavor, sparkling wines can be white, red, rosé, or pink. The flavors of each type of sparkling wine are very different.

A red sparkling wine can be fruity, rich, and satisfying, while a white can be dry, bright, and citrusy. Pinks can be anywhere in-between.

Thanks to the wide variety of sparkling wines, there is a perfect bottle for any meal or occasion.

Most people refer to any sparkling white wine as champagne, but this is not correct.

Only champagne made in the Champagne region of France according to the country’s production laws can truly be called champagne.

It’s correct to refer to all others as sparkling wines.

Read More: How Big is a Split of Champagne? If you have a wedding or other special event coming up, you may be thinking of using a split of Champagne as favors. Here’s what you need to know!

What is Wine?

red wine
Wine is a non-carbonated (still) drink made from fermented grapes.

Now that we’re clear on champagne and sparkling wine, let’s talk about wine.

Wine is made from fermented grapes or other fruit like strawberries, elderberries, or blackberries.

The most common types of wine are made from grapes. They can be red, white, pink, or rosé.

Wine can be dry, sweet, semi-sweet, or fortified like Port wine. Regular wine is still, or non-carbonated.

There are many different types of red wines, but the most popular types are Merlots, Cabernets, Shirazes, and Pinot Noirs.

Final Thoughts

Wine, sparkling wine, and champagne are all used for celebrating, though wine is most commonly consumed with regular meals.

Sparkling wines can also be paired with many meals, and so can champagne, but champagne is usually reserved for toasting and special events.

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